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FOOD & DINING IN RUSSIA / RUSSIA DINING GUIDE

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FOOD & DINING IN RUSSIA / RUSSIA DINING GUIDE

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Postby Russia Info » Wed May 30, 2007 8:49 am

FOOD & DINING IN RUSSIA

GENERAL

The kind of food visitors will eat from day to day depends on which city they are visiting and the time of year. Breakfast is often similar to the Scandinavian, with cold meats, boiled eggs and bread served with Russian tea. For the midday and evening meal the food is often more traditional, again depending on the region.

Moscow’s contemporary wining and dining scene is utterly unlike anything that existed here during the age of the Iron Curtain. The transformation of the city from Communist citadel tо Capitalist frontierland is reflected in the entirely new range of restaurants that have sprung up since the beginning of the 1990s – Irish bars, snazzy American diners, expensive Japanese restaurants, Australian pubs...the list goes on. From the thriving fast-food scene tо the numerous prestigious restaurants serving the new elites, eating and drinking in Moscow need never be boring. Moscow also harbours a surprisingly rich stock of ethnic cuisine from around the former Soviet Union, the most widespread being that of Georgia (a former Soviet republic tо the south) but also including Central Asian and other Caucasian varieties.

If you’ve got the money, Moscow’s selection of top class restaurants is unbeatable. Restaurants tend tо adopt a theme and wring it dry, so a visit tо the folk-based Sloboda really is a trip into Russian traditional culture (although you can bet the food wasn’t this good in a Russian village of yesteryear).

The new restaurants and cafés of the burgeoning St. Petersburg scene stand in sharp contrast to the traditional, sometimes uninspired, Russian-style eateries of the former Soviet Union. Of course, the old-style restaurants can still be found in abundance -- the places that insist on bottles of vodka on every table, the synthesizer-accompanied singer droning Russian chansons, and long, often pricey meals in settings designed to evoke the luxury of the Imperial past. Although it's certainly worth experiencing Russian-style dining during your stay -- and discovering the French underpinnings of Russian cuisine that become apparent at some of the finer establishments -- know that you have plenty of options, and you don't have to pay an exorbitant price to eat well.

Reserve plenty of time for your meal. In Russia dining out is an occasion, and Russians often make an evening (or an afternoon) out of going out to eat, especially at those Moscow showplaces replete with gilded cornices, hard-carved oak, and tinkling crystal. An unhurried splendor is definitely the order of the day.

National specialties

• Kasha (porridge) is a staple breakfast dish, made with milk and oats, buckwheat or semolina.

• Blini (small pancakes filled with caviar, fish, melted butter or sour cream).

• Ponchiki (hot sugared doughnuts).

• Pirozhky (fried rolls with different fillings, usually meat).

• Borshch, a beetroot soup served hot with sour cream.

• Pelmeni (meat dumplings).

National drinks

• Chai (sweet tea served without milk).

• Vodka (often flavoured and coloured with herbs and spices such as zubrovka (a kind of grass), ryabinovka (steeped with rowan-tree berries), starka (dark, smooth, aged vodka) and pertsovka (with hot pepper). Posolskaya, Stolichnaya and Rossiskaya are popular brands.

• Krushon (cold ‘punch’; champagne, brandy and summer fruit are poured into a hollowed watermelon and chilled for several hours).

• Nalivka (sweet liqueur made with fruit or berries).

• Nastoika is a fortified wine made of herbs, leaves, flowers, fruit and roots of plants with medicinal properties.

Note: Drinks are ordered by grams or by the bottle. City-centre bars close around midnight.

Tipping: Hotels in Moscow and other large cities include a 10 to 15 per cent service charge. Otherwise 10 per cent is customary.

PLACES TO DINE IN MOSCOW

Bungalo Bar
Zemlyanoy val 6,
Moscow
Tel: (+7 495) 916-2432

Dinastiia
Zubovskii Bulvar 29,
Moscow
Tel: (+7 495) 246-5017/ 7071
Fax: (+7 495) 246-5502

Le Diuk (Le Duc)
Ulitsa 1905 Goda 2,
Krasnopresnenkaia Naberezhnaia,
Moscow
Tel: (+7 495) 255-0390
Fax: (+7 495) 252-1825
Website: www.le-duc.ru

Le Gastronome
Kudrinskaia Ploshchad', 1
Moscow
Tel: (+7 495) 255-4433
Fax: (+7 495) 967-6888

Noev Kovcheg
Maly Ivanovsky Pereulok 7-9/1,
Moscow
Tel: (+7 495) 917-0717/ 4699
Email: kovcheg@noevkovcheg.ru , kovcheg@arknoahs.com
Website: www.noevkovcheg.ru

Pushkin
Tverskoi Bulvar 26A,
Moscow
Tel: (+7 495) 229-5590

Schwein
Lefortovskii Pereulok 12,
Moscow
Tel: (+7 495) 267-4504
Website: www.schwein.ru

Serebrianyi Vek
Teatral'nyi Proezd, 3,
Building 3,
Moscow
Tel: (+7 495) 926-1352
Fax: (+7 495) 928-7929

Settebello
Sadovaya-Samotechnaya Ulitsa 3,
Moscow
Tel: (+7 495) 299-1656/ 3039

Tavern Amarcord
Pokrovka Ulitsa 6,
Moscow
Tel: (+7 495) 923-0932
Email: taverna@amarkord.ru
Website: www.amarkord.ru

Tsarskaya Okhota
Rublevo-Uspenskoe Shosse 186A,
Poselok Zhukovka,
Moscow
Tel: (+7 495) 418-7982
Email: info@tsarshunt.ru
Website: www.tsarshunt.com.ru

Yar
Leningradsky Prospekt 32/21,
Moscow
Tel: (+7 495) 960-2000
Russia Info
 
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